In the Media, December 2011

National Public Radio
December 28, 2011
Los Angeles affiliate KCRW-FM featured a story about Eric Rice’s study on cell phones being as important to homeless teens as food or a drug habit. The study was published in the Journal of Urban Health and found that 62 percent of homeless youth had cell phones. "Cell phones have changed what it means to be a homeless teen as these youth can look for help beyond the streets,” Rice said. “If you don’t have to steal to get a meal, the chances of you going to jail decrease.”

Denver Post
December 28, 2011
A study by Eric Rice was featured, which concluded that a majority of homeless youth own cell phones and use them as lifelines to work, family and other sources of social support. The study found that 36 percent used a cell phone to call a potential or current employer; 17 percent called a case manager; and 41 percent called parents. Rice said that cell phones’ ability to keep kids connected could help them get off the streets. “It’s not a panacea, but it is a new tool that helps them to make connections and access resources and be consistent in how they do these things,” he noted.

Ventura County Star
December 24, 2011
Eugenia Weiss was quoted about the brain injuries and mental health issues soldiers returning from Iraq will face. She said the adjustment to a civilian life can be dramatic and potentially marked by high rates of suicide, divorce and child abuse. “We won’t really know the full effects,” she said. “It’s going to take another 10 to 20 years.”

Forbes
December 23, 2011
A study by Eric Rice was featured, which concluded cell phones are as important to homeless teens as food or a drug habit. The study was published in the Journal of Urban Health and found that 62 percent of homeless youth had cell phones. "Cell phones have changed what it means to be a homeless teen as these youth can look for help beyond the streets,” Rice said. “If you don’t have to steal to get a meal, the chances of you going to jail decrease.”

LA Weekly
December 21, 2011
A blog featured research by Eric Rice about cell phones being as important to homeless teens as food or a drug habit. The study found 62 percent of the teens surveyed had cell phones, 51 percent use them to call friends, 41 percent use them to call family, and 36 percent use them to call work or look for work. "Cell phones have changed what it means to be a homeless teen as these youth can look for help beyond the streets,” Rice said. “If you don’t have to steal to get a meal, the chances of you going to jail decrease.”

Huffington Post
December 21, 2011
A study by Eric Rice was featured, which concluded cell phones are as important to homeless teens as food or a drug habit. The study was published in the Journal of Urban Health and found that 62 percent of homeless youth had cell phones. "People think homeless folks couldn't possibly have a cell phone, but a phone is relatively accessible compared to a car, house or job, and it is how you get those things," Rice said.

CBS News
December 20, 2011
Los Angeles affiliate KCAL-TV featured research by Eric Rice about cell phones being as important to homeless teens as food or a drug habit. The study found 62 percent of the teens surveyed had cell phones, 51 percent use them to call friends, 41 percent use them to call family, and 36 percent use them to call work or look for work. "Cell phones have changed what it means to be a homeless teen as these youth can look for help beyond the streets,” Rice said. “If you don’t have to steal to get a meal, the chances of you going to jail decrease.”

KFI-AM
December 20, 2011
A study by Eric Rice was mentioned, which concluded cell phones are as important to homeless teens as food or a drug habit. The study was published in the Journal of Urban Health and found that 62 percent of homeless youth had cell phones. "Cell phones have changed what it means to be a homeless teen as these youth can look for help beyond the streets,” Rice said. “If you don’t have to steal to get a meal, the chances of you going to jail decrease.”

Mental Health Weekly
December 19, 2011
The USC School of Social Work’s military social work program was mentioned in connection to a story about proposed Congressional funding for a military mental health program for National Guard and Reserves units, coming on the heels of a successful pilot program in California. The article highlighted the school’s master’s degree in social work with a specialization in military social work and veteran services as a way to help address the critical workforce shortage of mental health professionals trained to address the mental health needs of returning veterans. “We’re the first research university in the country that offers graduate degrees in military social work,” Paul Maiden said, citing the program’s growth to 105 students this year.

Pasadena Star-News
December 5, 2011
Larry Palinkas was quoted about the psychological effects residents without power or heat are experiencing as a result of the recent windstorm. "The one thing about being in darkness for an extended time is you feel isolated. The lack of power is affecting people's ability to interact with others," Palinkas said. "The feeling of isolation doesn't go away when power is restored.” At the same time, some people can endure horrific events, like wars and genocide, and return to normalcy. A person's reaction to trauma depends on how he or she copes with the events, he said.

Fox News
December 2, 2011
Donalisa Helsey, a student in the Virtual Academic Center, was interviewed on Tulsa, Okla. affiliate KOKI-TV about her award-winning children’s book and earning her master’s degree from the USC School of Social Work. “In May, I will walk across the University of Southern California stage,” she said. “I live in Tulsa. They just started a Virtual Academic Center, so I do this online. I go to class at a certain time. Every day I log on. I see my professors, they see me. I see my classmates. It’s a great honor, and I’m so excited. I can’t wait.”

National Public Radio
December 2, 2011
Los Angeles affiliate KPCC-FM featured a report by Ron Avi Astor and colleagues, who studied how children are affected by their parents’ military deployments. The effects include higher suicide rates and suicide ideation, higher levels of bullying and trouble in school. “If schools and normative settings like clinics and hospitals are not responsive to kids, we see that there are mental health outcomes,” Astor said. Astor collaborated on a video that interviewed kids about their parents’ deployment.